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TIE Codes

T
Transmitting the knowledge base.
I
Initiating intellectual independence.
E
Emphasizing independent inquiry

Definitions of Activity Types

Transmitting the Knowledge Base
In a “T” type of course, faculty provide instruction that is designed to transmit the knowledge base, skills, methodologies, analytical approaches, and techniques associated with a discipline or field, ranging from the basic to the advanced level. The course content is developed by the faculty and organized on the basis of a syllabus or plan developed in advance of the beginning of the course. In “T” courses, there is typically a great deal of interaction between the instructor and the student (in the form of class discussion, office meetings, email communication, etc.), but the basic feature of the course is transmission of a fixed body of knowledge to be mastered by the student.
Initiating Intellectual Independence
In an “I” type of course, the aim is to develop students’ abilities to pursue creative/professional/scholarly work as required by the discipline or field. Participation by the faculty member provides experience with the methodologies of the discipline or field and requires prior acquisition of the relevant knowledge base and skills. Instruction, both content and pedagogy, is more experiential in nature and tailored to the needs and interests of the particular students. Such a course may involve small groups or teams of students working on faculty-assigned projects/tasks under the direct supervision of the faculty. These courses are designed to enhance students’ problem-solving abilities, critical analysis capabilities, and individual creativity to enable them to apply their knowledge to complex problems, issues, and techniques.
Emphasizing Independent Inquiry
In an “E” type of course, faculty guide, mentor, and monitor advanced students who are undertaking independent creative/professional/scholarly work, generally as the culmination of their degree program. Students’ participation is conditional on their mastery of the area they choose to pursue. These courses are one-on-one, or very small, group experiences with intensive interaction between the faculty member and the student. Students play an active role in defining the topic to be studied or the project to be undertaken, including the approach to the inquiry. Courses in this category usually meet on an ad-hoc basis in a location convenient to both the student and the faculty member.
T: Fieldwork-Skills/Techniques
A course that takes place in a field location in which the primary objective is for the student to acquire mastery of techniques and principles that are best learned in the field setting. Fieldwork—Skills/Techniques is commonly associated with the physical sciences, human development, and social work, where the sites provide direct access to specimens, structures, social situations, and clients. The specific work to be completed for course credit is very similar for all enrolled students. On occasion, these courses are taken in tandem with Fieldwork—Research courses as a distinct component of a fieldwork experience.
T: Laboratory-Skills/Techniques
A course that takes place in a laboratory setting in which the primary, but not exclusive, objective is for the student to acquire mastery of techniques and principles that are best learned in a laboratory setting. Students typically gain hands-on experience in the use of equipment and procedures, and they conduct, analyze, and write up a set of specified laboratory exercises. The specific work to be completed for course credit is very similar for all students enrolled in the specific course. This course type also includes foreign language courses in which the primary focus is the acquisition of listening and speaking skills in the language being taught and courses whose primary objective is to advance students’ composition and rhetoric skills.
T: Lecture
A course in which the primary goal is the transfer of a body of knowledge from an instructor to a group of students through didactic instruction. This is accomplished by the instructor presenting that body of knowledge in a primarily oral form, supplemented by required reading and problem assignments appropriate to the discipline. While there
may be discussion, question and answer, and other forms of interaction between instructor and student, the primary means of accomplishing the desired transfer of knowledge is via presentations made by the instructor in a variety of media appropriate to the topic. Colloquia should be categorized as Lecture.
T: Lecture plus Supplementary Activity
A course that is a unified combination of a Lecture course and a Laboratory-Skills/Techniques, Fieldwork, or Discussion Section (including those led by graduate students) in which the primary goal is the transfer of a body of knowledge from an instructor to a group of students through didactic instruction. (Note that a Discussion Section is not an Instructional Activity Type because it is a secondary, generally non-credit bearing, section.) Students enroll in the two components as a single course, and a single grade is issued for the combined instructional experience. The relative distribution of lecture
activities and laboratory activities will vary depending upon the particular course but it will usually be the case that the lecture activities and the laboratory activities are delivered in different places and at different times. Other courses given for credit and graded separately and having required concurrent enrollment are not supplemental activities. Laboratory courses that have a relatively small lecture component and where most of the class time is spent in the laboratory should be classified as Laboratory—Skills/Techniques.
T: Seminar-Topical
A course conducted in a seminar format (i.e., in a small classroom setting where the faculty member and the students consider concepts and exchange ideas through discussion, research papers, presentations, and/or performances) in which the topic is defined by the professor and the primary goal is the transfer of a body of knowledge. The nature of the work to be completed for course credit is very similar for all enrolled students.
T: Studio-Technique
A course that takes place in a studio setting in which the primary, but not only, objective is for the student to acquire mastery of techniques and principles that are best learned in a studio setting. For example, students gain hands-on experience in the technique and creative application of a musical instrument, film or video equipment, the paint brush, computer graphic programs, or control of the voice, etc. The nature of the work to be completed for course credit is very similar for all enrolled students.
I: Fieldwork-Research
A course that takes place in a field location in which the primary objective is for the student to gain experience in research methodologies and practices utilized in the discipline or profession. Fieldwork is commonly associated with the physical sciences, human development, and social work where the sites provide direct access to specimens, structures, social situations, and clients. Students are usually expected to produce a research product that includes the collection of data and/or direct client interaction, analysis, and the writing of a report. The specific work to be completed for course credit will differ for each enrolled student. In general, these courses are advanced courses for which the student has mastered or is in the process of mastering the basic content and methodologies of the discipline. On occasion, these courses are taken in tandem with Fieldwork—Skills/Techniques courses as a distinct component of a fieldwork experience.
I: Internship
A course in which students carry out all or a major part of the work at an offcampus site. The site is selected because its characteristics allow for a beneficial experience that could not be achieved on campus. Often the professionals at the internship placement site take an active role, along with the faculty member, in shaping student experience, and these professionals at the site provide a substantial degree of guidance and feedback. The form of the internship and evaluation of the student’s performance is the responsibility of the faculty member. This course type shares some features of fieldwork courses.
I: Laboratory-Research
A course that takes place in a laboratory setting in which the primary, but not exclusive, objective is for the student to gain experience in the production of new knowledge in a laboratory setting. Students are usually expected to produce a research product that includes the collection of data, analysis of those data, and the writing of a report. The specific work to be completed for course credit will differ for each enrolled student.
I: Legal/Medical Clerkship
A form of internship generally used in the context of medical or law school curricula that usually takes place in an off-campus location, such as a hospital or courthouse.
I: Practicum
A course in which the primary goal is to enhance the student’s previously acquired knowledge and abilities by applying them to real cases or situations that are carefully supervised by the instructor. This course type is most typically used in fields such as clinical psychology, social welfare, and other healing arts to describe a course in which the student is having his or her first supervised experience in delivering interventions.
I: Practicum-Teaching
A course in which faculty members formally prepare students, especially teaching assistants, who are responsible for instructing other students in discussion, laboratory, or other class settings (primarily secondary sections) to meet their teaching responsibilities. Such instruction may be relevant to a particular course, or it may be in anticipation of future teaching.
I: Project
A course in which a faculty member guides one or more students, typically a group of students, in solving a complex problem specified by the faculty member. The primary goal is to gain knowledge of how complicated systems work and why successful solutions must consider multiple aspects of a problem. This instruction type is typically used in engineering, management, and some other professional disciplines.
I: Seminar-Research/Creative Development
A course conducted in a seminar format (i.e., in a small classroom setting where the faculty member and the students consider concepts and exchange ideas through discussion, research papers, presentations, and/or performances) in which the primary focus of the seminar is ongoing research/creative work being conducted by the participants in the seminar. Student presentations, papers, and/or projects are a major component of the seminar. The specific work to be completed for course credit will differ for each enrolled student. Most laboratory research meetings would be in this category.
I: Studio-Production/Creative Development
A course that takes place in a studio setting in which the primary, but not only, objective is for the student to gain experience in the production of major creative works in a studio setting. Students are expected to enhance the development of their work, which might be perfecting a performance, creating a series of paintings, a musical composition, a film, a public performance or exhibition (including design of specific aspects such as production set, lighting, or costume design), or similar creative output(s).
I: Tutorial
A course where a faculty member meets with a very small group of students with the aim of facilitating their mastering a body of knowledge. The role of the faculty member is to assist and guide the student’s progress rather than present information in a didactic fashion. Tutorials will tend to meet at a regular time and place.
E: Conference
A form of individualized study in which a student and a faculty member meet on a regular, one-on-one basis to discuss ongoing work such as a research project, dissertation work, or other academic issues.
E: Individualized Instruction
A course in which a faculty member and a student directly negotiate the content of the course, and the method by which the student will meet the goals of, and receive credit for, the course. Students work with a great degree of selfdirection, but their progress is dependent upon the guidance and review of a faculty member. These courses include those in which master’s or doctoral students register while conducting thesis and dissertation research and writing theses and dissertations. In Individualized Instruction courses, students may carry out activities in a research laboratory, conduct research in a library or similar intellectual environment, and/or develop a creative product such as a series of paintings, an extensive computer project, or a performance. Individualized Instruction courses may also involve the faculty member and the student agreeing upon a set of readings that the student will use as the starting point for the production of a paper or other scholarly work such as a musical composition or other creative activity. (In the old categorization method, many courses of this type are categorized as Independent Study.) Individualized Instruction courses typically meet on an ad-hoc basis at a location convenient to both the faculty member and student.
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